Stargazing Simplified: The following is a brief excerpt from a Sky & Telescope Magazine article by James Mullaney. Something for contemplation!

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Stargazing Simplified!
James Mullaney, F.R.A.S.

Stargazing Simplified! Of the more than 1,000 articles on observing I’ve published over the past 60 years, this is the title of the one I consider to be the most important of them all. It appeared in the April, 2014, issue of Sky & Telescope magazine. The opening paragraph appears below. If this speaks to you and you have access to back issues of the magazine, hopefully you will take time to check out the entire article! –Jim Mullaney

Today’s hectic lifestyle, obsession with computers and high-tech electronic gadgets and mantra that “bigger is better” (in TV screens at least) has carried over into amateur astronomy. Witness the Messier and other observing “marathons,” computer-controlled remote CCD-imaging telescopes, and observatory-sized trailer-mounted Dobsonian reflectors. Casual, relaxing stargazing seems to be largely a thing of the past — something practiced by only a few of us purists. To me, stargazing should provide a relaxing interlude from the pressures and worries of everyday living rather than contribute to them.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-resources/stargazing-basics/learn-the-sky/stargazing-simplified/
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This little glass has yet another virtue over big ones: it has a relatively limited number of targets! Now most readers probably would not consider this an advantage — but it is! I’m not tempted to find large numbers of objects when I go out — eliminating the malady I refer to as “saturated stargazing.” Michael Covington tells us that “All galaxies deserve to be stared at for a full 15 minutes.” I would extend this advice to every celestial object. I prefer to view at most a dozen of the sky’s wonders (including the Moon and planets) during the course of an evening in a relaxed and contemplative manner. To me, glancing at an object, then rushing on to another and another is like reading the Cliff’s Notes of the world’s great novels.   James Mullaney

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