NGC 7129: Cluster+Nebula In Cepheus, October 2018 Observer’s Challenge Report #116

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NGC 7129: Cluster + Nebula.  Magnitudes;  nebula 11.5;  stars 10 

Image by Mario Motta from Massachusetts: 

30 minutes luminance, 15 minutes each of red-green-blue filters, total 75 minutes imaging.  The image was taken with a 32 inch f/6 reflector. 
A difficult object, and could not use narrowband filters as NGC 7129 is a reflection nebula.  I used color filters, but with the bright stars in the image allowed star bloat, so subs had to be short, 3 minutes each.   Mario Motta 

NGC7129

 

254 mm  1494 focal length  f/5.9  Newtonian Reflector – Notes and sketches by Sue French from New York 

43x: Swept up by moving 1.4 degrees west from the pretty blue and gold optical double Argyle 43 (ARY 43; WDS magnitudes 6.4, 6.8; separation 100 arcseconds).  The nebula appears fairly faint but is readily visible.

115x: The sketch was mostly executed at this magnification, but it was slightly touched up in a couple places at 213x. The brightest part of the nebula occupies a region that includes four stars. The northernmost star in the haze is very dim and couched in its own tiny halo of light.  It stands out better at the higher power. Insubstantial mist trails west-southwest from the main mass, but its extent and form are difficult to perceive.  The southernmost star on the sketch glows with a golden hue.   Sue French 

Pencil sketch with inverted colors:  SF

NGC 7129 inv

 

NGC 7129

 

Notes and sketches by Roger Ivester from North Carolina

In my 10-inch reflector a cluster of four brighter stars with some fainter members, enveloped by nebulosity with greater concentration around the two northernmost stars.  The nebula has fairly high surface brightness, and easy to see at 57x, but best seen at 114x, and without any type of filter.  The sparse cluster and nebulosity is very easy to locate and see, and stands out prominently in the star field.   Roger Ivester 

Pencil sketch using a 10-inch reflector @ 114x.   RI

NGC 7129 Sketch

Pencil sketch with inverted colors:   RI 

Rogers NGC-7129 Inverted

 

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