NGC 3395-96 – Interacting Galaxies in Leo Minor – Observer’s Challenge Report For April 2017 – Month # 98

Complete Report:  APRIL 2017 OBSERVERS CHALLENGE – NGC-3395-96

Image by Mario Motta –  Observer from Massachusetts –  32-inch telescope – One hour:  6 exposures x 10 minutes stacked 

NGC3395-6

Coordinates:  RA: 10h 49.8m   Dec. +33.0′ 

NGC 3395-96 – Interacting Galaxies – Leo Minor – Visual magnitudes: 12.1/12.2  Sfc. Br. 12.9/13.4   Size: 1.9′ x 1.2′ NGC 3396 2.8′ x 1.2′ – “NGC 3395 small but bright oblong;  NGC 3396 lies 1′ E; small oblong; tough but worthy pair!  don’t leave without seeing spiral galaxy NGC 3430 just 30′ to E.    Tom Lorenzin  1000+ The Amateur Astronomer’s Field Guide to Deep-Sky Observing

 

NGC 3395 is another 12th-magnitude spiral, about 2′ in diameter.  Amateur telescopes will show it almost in contact with NGC 3396 at its northeast edge.  These are interacting galaxies, but the bridge of material between them does not show in small telescopes.  Has anyone viewed them with a 30-inch aperture?   Walter Scott Houston  Deep-Sky Wonders – selections and commentary by Stephen James O’Meara 

 

In my 130mm refractor at 48× NGC 3430 shares the field with the colliding galaxies NGC 3395 and NGC 3396. Their combined glow appears a little smaller and fainter than the lone galaxy. At 117× these entangled galaxies each harbor a brighter center, with NGC 3395 boasting the more obvious one. NGC 3396 is elongated approximately east-west, with NGC 3395 south of its western end, where their halos blend together. Seen through my 10-inch scope at 166×, NGC 3396 hosts an elongated core with a starlike nucleus.

NGC 3395 and NGC 3396 have undergone at least one close encounter in the past and are now thought to be in the early stages of a merger, a show we are watching from a distance of 85 million light-years.    Sue French – Observer from New York 

 

I also observed NGC 3395-6 under dark skies with a 10” reflector at 81x.  It was easily seen, appearing most like an asymmetric butterfly  with close interaction of the galaxy pair.   Joseph Rothchild – Observer from Massachusetts 
NGC 3395 and 3396 are a pair of interacting galaxies in the constellation Leo Minor. The galaxies are thought to be in the early stages of merging. The galaxies were discovered by William Herschel in 1785 using an 18.7-inch reflector.

NGC 3395, the brighter of the two galaxies, is magnitude 12 and is roughly 1.6 x0.9 arc minutes in size. Its core is south-west of NGC 3396. NGC 3395 is a Hubble type Sc spiral galaxies.

NGC 3396 is slightly dimmer and slightly larger than NGC 3395. It shines at magnitude 12.4 and is 3.1×1.3 arc minutes in size. NGC 3396 is a barred spiral galaxy.

My image of NGC 3395 and 3396 was taken with a 10-inch f/6.9 Newtonian with a SBIG ST-2000XCM CCD camera. The exposure was 150 minutes. West is to the right and north is up. Several smaller fainter galaxies can be seen scattered throughout the image. The brightest star in the image, located near the left (east) edge, shines at magnitude 10.3. NGC 3396 is on the left, NGC 3395 on the right.

NGC3395

Sometimes NGC 3395 is measured to be larger than the size I reported above. That is because the galaxy lies along the line of sight of a slightly larger and slightly dimmer background galaxy. This galaxy is PGC 4534783, a magnitude 13.2 galaxy. PGC 4534783 is 2.3 x 1 arc minutes in size and the position angle is nearly identical to NGC 3395.

The bright emission nebula IC 2605 lies in the southern edge of NGC 3395. The nebula can be seen in the accompanying image near the edge of the visible galaxy. This nebula was discovered April 11, 1899 by Guillaume Bigourdan. He estimated the magnitude to be 15 and size 0.4 x 0.2 arc minutes.

I viewed NGC3395 and 3396 with a 6-inch refractor under clear dark skies. The galaxies appeared as elongated glows close to one another, but the interacting portions of the galaxies were not bright enough to see.     Dr. James Dire from Hawaii

 

Observer:  Roger Ivester – Date: March 18, 2017  
Telescope: 10-Inch Reflector
Sketch Magnification: 135x
Eyepiece: 16 mm + 1.9x Barlow

Galaxy NGC 3395-96: Almost connecting. Both galaxies are elongated, brighter middles with NGC 3396 having a distinctive stellar nucleus when using averted vision, but could only be seen intermittently. I could glimpse the galaxies using a low magnification of 57x, but the best views came at 200x, and 135x, respectively, which would indicate that both galaxies are fairly well concentrated. Joseph Rothchild from Massachusetts, using a 10-inch reflector provided an excellent description of this beautiful interacting pair: “Easily seen, appearing most like an asymmetric butterfly….”

Another galaxy, NGC 3340, only 1/2º to the east of the NGC 3395-96 pair, has low surface brightness. Elongated NE-SW with an oval shape and a very subtle brightening or greater concentration in the central region. Despite the low surface brightness, I found that a higher magnification of 191x worked best.

Roger Ivester:  Observer from North Carolina 

NGC 3395-96:  Pencil Sketch with colors inverted:

Rogers NGC-3395-96a

NGC 3395-96:  Pencil sketch direct from the telescope eyepiece without colors inverted:

FullSizeRender

NGC 3430:  Direct pencil sketch from the telescope eyepiece without colors inverted.  

image001

 

Glenn Chaple:  Observer from Massachusetts

“I observed and sketched these interacting galaxies with a 13.1-inch f/4.5 Coulter Odyssey I reflector and 9mm Nagler eyepiece (166X, 0.5 degree field). The galaxies were relatively easy to find by star-hopping from a trio of stars that included 46 LMi and 46 UMa to a wide double star a degree south and slightly west, then shifting one-half. I had previously viewed these galaxies with fellow ATMoB members Steve Clougherty and Rich Nugent, using Steve’s 18-inch Dob. They were barely perceptible, but skies were rapidly hazing up. These galaxies definitely need clear skies!”

You’ll like this. On the same night we viewed NGC 3395/6, Steve and Rich also turned the 18-inch on your Virgo Diamond. I’m not sure which of them had the finder chart, but they did this on their own – no prodding from me

 

Glenn Chaple 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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