Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ category

Orion Telescopes and Binoculars Deep-Sky Challenge: Galaxy NGC 891 Andromeda: November

September 17, 2016

http://www.telescope.com/Articles/Deep-Sky-Challenge/November-Deep-Sky-Challenge-Edge-on-Spiral-Galaxy-NGC-891/pc/-1/c/9/sc/770/p/106212.uts

By Roger Ivester

Celebrating The Universe – The Latest Book By James Mullaney

September 17, 2016

9781401941727

The very first work of its kind, Celebrating the Universe: The Spirituality & Science of Stargazing by James Mullaney is a guide to the wonders of the heavens visible to the unaided eye, binoculars and small telescopes with a focus on the “soul” of the night sky! This travel guide to the stars is written from a metaphysical and spiritual perspective in addition to a scientific one. The unique unifying theme throughout is the personal benefits of communing with celestial wonders firsthand—the joy and heady excitement of participating in the great cosmic drama unfolding nightly overhead. This involves such little-known aspects of stargazing as therapeutic relaxation, celestial meditation, expansion of consciousness, and spiritual upliftment. Based on his more than 60 years’ experience as an astronomy writer, speaker and stargazer, it’s available from http://www.HayHouse.com or Amazon.com.   By James Mullaney  

I just ordered and received my copy from http://www.Amazon.com only this week.  Once I started reading it was difficult to put down.  It took me back to a simpler time when I was thirteen years old, observing from a weedy field beside my childhood home, using my brother’s 60 mm refractor.  I especially remember those frosty nights of fall after a hot and humid summer.  What a relief!  It was a wonderful feeling being out all by myself….gazing at a beautiful velvety black sky, devoid of light pollution.  Being so new to the hobby it was difficult for me to find deep-sky objects, but that didn’t matter, as I could always study the moon.  I’m just glad that I persevered, as it did get easier.  On some nights I would forget the telescope and just enjoy looking at the different star colors or try to identify the constellations.  I especially remember thinking…. are we all alone or was there life on other planets?  What an exciting time!  Celebrating the Universe took me back to those days.  Roger Ivester

An excerpt from the book:

“Staring up at the sky, we’re looking into the beginning of everything.  We feel young once again, and the child within us is set free.  Our minds are opened to receiving, beyond preconceived notions, the most profound insights about creation and the mysteries of the universe.”   

Stargazing Simplified: The following is a brief excerpt from a Sky & Telescope Magazine article by James Mullaney. Something for contemplation!

August 25, 2016

image.aspx

Stargazing Simplified!
James Mullaney, F.R.A.S.

Stargazing Simplified! Of the more than 1,000 articles on observing I’ve published over the past 60 years, this is the title of the one I consider to be the most important of them all. It appeared in the April, 2014, issue of Sky & Telescope magazine. The opening paragraph appears below. If this speaks to you and you have access to back issues of the magazine, hopefully you will take time to check out the entire article! –Jim Mullaney

Today’s hectic lifestyle, obsession with computers and high-tech electronic gadgets and mantra that “bigger is better” (in TV screens at least) has carried over into amateur astronomy. Witness the Messier and other observing “marathons,” computer-controlled remote CCD-imaging telescopes, and observatory-sized trailer-mounted Dobsonian reflectors. Casual, relaxing stargazing seems to be largely a thing of the past — something practiced by only a few of us purists. To me, stargazing should provide a relaxing interlude from the pressures and worries of everyday living rather than contribute to them.

http://www.skyandtelescope.com/astronomy-resources/stargazing-basics/learn-the-sky/stargazing-simplified/
———————————————————————————————————————————-
This little glass has yet another virtue over big ones: it has a relatively limited number of targets! Now most readers probably would not consider this an advantage — but it is! I’m not tempted to find large numbers of objects when I go out — eliminating the malady I refer to as “saturated stargazing.” Michael Covington tells us that “All galaxies deserve to be stared at for a full 15 minutes.” I would extend this advice to every celestial object. I prefer to view at most a dozen of the sky’s wonders (including the Moon and planets) during the course of an evening in a relaxed and contemplative manner. To me, glancing at an object, then rushing on to another and another is like reading the Cliff’s Notes of the world’s great novels.   James Mullaney

Moon Day by James Mullaney

July 23, 2016

Something I wanted to share by my friend of many years, James Mullaney.  James is an astronomy writer, author, lecturer, former associate editor at both Astronomy and Sky & Telescope Magazines.  I sent James (Jim) a hand written letter almost twenty five years ago, praising him for his reference book “The Finest Deep-Sky Objects” and we’ve corresponded and been friends every since.  I’m really glad that I wrote that letter….sent via USPS with a stamp.   Roger Ivester 

 

Happy Moon Day! by James Mullaney  July 19 03:15PM -0400

Hi Everyone,

As I do just about every year at this time, I’m pushing for a national or international holiday to celebrate this momentous historic event. If there’s a Columbus Day on the calendar, surely there should be a Moon Day every July 20th. Still amazes me how many people have no clue what that date is (or October 4th, the beginning of the Space Age). Take a poll of your typical planetarium audience to see for yourself. But then just as shocking is how many people don’t know who Carl Sagan was. How very sad and shameful on all accounts.

Jim Mullaney, FRAS

Glenn Chaple Double Star Marathon List

February 18, 2016

For those of you…like me, who have always enjoyed the challenges and beauty of double and multiple stars, rather than a Messier marathon, why not a double star marathon, consisting of 110 double and multiple stars.  

Many double star enthusiastic which would include myself, have often referred to them as “jewels of the night sky.”   Roger Ivester     
 

Double Star Marathon Observing List by Glenn Chapel, Associate Editor, Astronomy Magazine from Massachusetts, as following:

    Object                     R.A.              Dec.          Mags.      Sep(“)     P.A.
1. STF 3053              00 02.6      +66 06      6.0, 7.2       15.0         70
2. alpha Cas            00 40.5       +56 32      2.4, 9.0      69.5      282
3. eta Cas                  00 49.1       +57 49      3.4, 7.5      12.0       307
4. STF 163 Cas         01 51.3       +64 51       6.8, 9.1      33.9          36
5. gamma Ari          01 53.5       +19 18       4.8, 4.8       7.8             0
6. lambda Ari          01 57.9      +23 36       4.9, 7.7      37.7           46
7. gamma And        02 03.9     +42 20      2.3, 5.5        9.8            63
8. iota Tri                  02 12.4     +30 18       5.3, 6.9        3.9            71
9. alpha UMi            02 31.8     +89 16       2.0, 9.0     18.4         218
10. eta Per                 02 50.7     +55 54       3.8, 8.5     28.3         300

11. STF 331 Per         03 00.9    +52 21        5.3, 6.7      12.1           85
12. 32 Eri                   03 54.3     -02 57       4.8, 6.1       6.8          347
13. STF 485 Cam     04 07.8    +62 20       6.9, 6.9    17.7          305
14. omi2 Eri              04 15.3    -07 39        4.4, 9.7    83.0         104
15. chi Tau                 04 22.6   +25 38        5.5, 7.6    19.4           24
16. 1 Cam                   04 32.0    +53 55        5.7, 6.8    10.3         308
17. 55 Eri                     04 43.6   -08 48       6.7, 6.8     9.2          317
18. rho Orionis          05 13.3    +02 52       4.6, 8.5      7.1           64
19. beta Ori                05 14.5    -08 12        0.1, 6.8      9.5        202
20. 118 Tau                05 29.3   +25 09       5.8, 6.6      4.8        204

21. delta Ori               05 32.0   -00 18        2.2, 6.3    52.6       359
22. STF 747 Ori         05 35.0   -06 00       4.8, 5.7     35.7       223
23. lambda Ori          05 35.1    +09 56       3.6, 5.5       4.4         43
24. theta1 Ori             05 35.3   -05 23        6.7, 7.9       8.8         31
                                                                                     5.1       13.0       132
                                                                                     6.7      21.5         96
25. iota Ori                  05 35.4    -05 55       2.8, 6.9     11.3       141
26. STF 742                 05 36.4    +22 00      7.1, 7.5       4.0      274
27. sigma Ori              05 38.7    -02 36       4.0, 7.5     12.9       84
                                                                                        6.5    43.0       61
28. gamma Lep          05 44.5    -22 27       3.7, 6.3    96.0     350
29. STF 817 Ori           05 54.9     +07 02      8.7, 8.9   18.8        73
30. epsilon Mon          06 23.8    +04 36      4.5, 6.5    13.4        27

31. beta Mon                06 28.8   -07 02  AB 4.6, 5.0    7.1       133
                                                                           BC 5.0, 5.3   2.9       108
32. 12 lyn                      06 46.2    +59 27         5.4, 7.3    8.7      308
33. 38 Gem                    06 54.6    +13 11          4.7, 7.8    7.3      326
34. h3945 CMa            07 16.6    -23 19          5.0, 5.8  26.8       52
35. 19 Lyn                      07 22.9    +55 17          5.6, 6.5  14.8      315
36. alpha Gem             07 34.6     +31 53          1.9, 2.9   2.2       171
37. STF 1121 Pup         07 36.6     -14 29         7.0, 7.3    7.4      305
38. k Puppis                  07 38.8     -26 48         4.5, 4.7    9.9     318
39. 2 Pup                       07 45.5     -14 41          6.0, 6.7   16.6    340
40. zeta Cnc                 08 12.2      +17 39         5.1, 6.2     5.9       72

41. phi2 Cnc                 08 26.8      +26 56       6.2, 6.2     5.2     218
42. iota Cnc                  08 46.7      +28 46       4.2, 6.6  30.0     307
43. 38 Lyn                     09 18.8      +36 48        3.9, 6.6    2.7     229
44. zeta1 Ant                09 30.8      -31  53        6.1, 6.8    8.1      212
45. gamma Leo           10 20.0      +19 51         2.2, 3.5    4.4      122
46. 54 Leo                     10 55.6       +24 45       4.5, 6.3     6.5      110
47. N Hya                       11 32.3       -29 16        5.8, 5.9    9.2      210
48. delta Crv                 12 29.9      -16 31         3.0, 9.2   24.2    214
49. 24 Com                   12 35.1        +18 23        5.2, 6.7  20.3     271
50. STF 1659 Crv         12 35.7       -12 01         8.0, 8.3  27.5     352

51. STF 1664 Vir           12 38.3     -11 31           7.8, 9.2   37.2    224
52. STF 1669 Crv          12 41.3     -13 01          5.9, 5.9     5.3     312
53. gamma Vir              12 41.7     -01 27         3.5, 3.5      3.6     293
54. 32 Cam                     12 49.2    +83 25        5.3, 5.8    21.6     326
55. alpha CVn                12 56.0     +38 19         2.9, 5.5    19.4    229
56. zeta UMa                 13 23.9     +54 56         2.3, 4.0    14.4    152
57. 3 (K) Cen                  13 51.8      -33 00        4.5, 6.0      7.9    106
58. kappa Boo               14 13.5      +51 47         4.6, 6.6    13.4    236
59. iota Boo                   14 16.2      +51 22         4.9, 7.5     38.0     33
60. STF 1835 Boo         14 23.4     +08 27         5.0, 6.8      6.2    194

61. pi Boo                       14 40.7     +16 25          4.9, 5.8      5.6    108
62. epsilon Boo            14 45.0     +27 04         2.5, 4.9      2.8    339
63. xi Boo                       14 51.4      +19 06         4.7, 7.0      6.9    332
64. delta Boo                15 15.5       +33 19          3.5, 8.7   105.0     79
65. mu Boo                    15 24.5      +37 23         4.3, 7.0   108.0    171
66. delta Ser                  15 34.8      +10 32         4.2, 5.2       3.9    178
67. zeta CrB                   15 39.4      +36 38         5.1, 6.0       6.3    305
68. beta Ser                   15 46.2      +15 25          3.7, 10.0  30.9   264
69. xi Sco                        16 04.4      -11 22          4.8, 7.3     7.6        51

70. beta Sco                    16 05.4      -19 48         2.6, 4.9    13.6      21
71. kappa Her                16 08.1       +17 03         5.3, 6.5     28.0     12
72. nu Sco                       16 12.0       -19 28         4.3, 6.4    41.0    337
73. sigma CrB                16 14.7        +33 52         5.6, 6.6     6.2    233
74. 16,17 Dra                  16 36.2       +52 55         5.4, 6.4     3.4     108
                                                                                               5.5   90.0   194
75. mu Dra                     17 05.3        +54 28        5.7, 5.7       2.0     42
76. alpha Her                17 14.6         +14 23        3.5, 5.4      4.7     107
77. delta Her                  17 15.0         +24 50       3.1, 8.2      8.9    236
78. 36 Oph                     17 15.3         -26 36         5.1, 5.1      4.4     154
79. omicron Oph         17 18.0         -24 17          5.4, 6.9   10.3    355
80. rho Her                   17 23.7          +37 09         4.6, 5.6    4.1     316

81. nu Dra                     17 32.2          +55 11          4.9, 4.9    62.0   312
82. psi Dra                    17 41.9           +72 09       4.9, 6.1     30.3      15
83. PZ4 (h5003) Sgr  17 59.1          -30 15          5.4, 7.0      5.8    107
84. 40,41 Dra               18 00.2        +80 00         5.7, 6.1     19.3   232
85. 95 Her                     18 01.5          +21 36         5.0, 5.1       6.3   258
86. 70 Oph                    18 05.5          +02 30        4.2, 6.0     2.8      72
87. 100 Her                   18 07.8         +26 06        5.8, 5.8    14.2    183
88. epsilon1 Lyr          18 44.3          +39 40        5.0, 6.1       2.1    352
89. epsilon2 Lyr                                                        5.3, 5.4      2.4     82
90. zeta Lyr                  18 44.8          +37 36        4.3, 5.9     44.0   150

91. beta Lyr                  18 50.1           +33 22        3.4, 8.6     46.0    149
92. SHJ 282 Lyr          18 54.9           +33 58        6.0, 7.7     45.0    350
93. theta Ser                18 56.2           +04 12        4.5, 5.4     22.3    104
94. STF 2470 Lyr       19 08.8           +34 46       7.0, 8.4    13.6      268
95. STF 2474 Lyr       19 09.1            +34 36        6.8, 7.9    15.8     262
96. beta Cyg                19 30.7            +27 58        3.1, 5.1      34.4       54
97. 16 Cyg                    19 41.8            +50 32        6.0, 6.2    39.1      134
98. 57 Aql                     19 54.6           -08 14        5.8, 6.5     36.0     170
99. h1470 Cyg             20 03.7           +38 20       7.4, 9.2    28.6     340
100. kappa Cep           20 08.9          +77 43        4.4, 8.3      7.2      120

101. gamma Del         20 46.7           +16 07       4.5, 5.5       9.6     268
102. 61 Cyg                  21 06.9            +38 45       5.2, 6.0    28.0     146
103. beta Cep              21 28.7            +70 34       3.2, 7.9     13.3      249
104. STF 2816 Cep    21 39.0            +57 29       5.6, 7.7      11.7      121
                                                                                              7.8      20.0    339
105. STF 2819 Cep      21 40.4         +57 35         7.4, 8.6     12.7       59
106. epsilon Peg          21 44.2        +09 52         2.4, 8.4   142.0    320
107. xi Cep                     22 03.8        +64 38         4.4, 6.5      7.7      277
108. delta Cep              22 29.2        +58 25         3.9, 6.3     41.0     192
109. 8 Lac                      22 35.9         +39 38        5.7, 6.5     22.4     186
110. sigma Cas             23 59.0         +55 45         5.0, 7.1        3.0    326

2015 in review

December 31, 2015

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 9,100 times in 2015. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

NGC 6543 – Planetary Nebula – Draco

August 9, 2010
NGC 6543 10-Inch @ 190x

Planetary Nebula In Draco