Archive for December 2017

University Optics Close Doors After More than 55+ Years

December 3, 2017

I’m a bit late in finding out, but University Optics closed its doors in ~June 2017.  I am saddened to hear this. 

After 25 years, I still use my UO Konigs 12 mm, 16 mm, 24 mm in 1.25″ format, and a 32 mm 2-inch, and a 20 mm UO Erfle.  I also have a University Optics 2.8x Klee Barlow.  

About 15 years ago I called the owner, Mr. Seyfried.  My 12 mm Konig had a streak of light crossing the FOV when observing brighter stars.  Seyfried told me to send it back (after more than 10 years) and he would replace the lens.  

I received the EP back in less than a couple weeks, and it performs perfectly to this day.  Now this is a warranty and service for sure!  I was willing to pay, but Mr. Seyfried would have no part of this.  

An ad from the 70’s in S&T:  A complete UO 6-inch reflector OTA kit for sale.  You had to assemble all parts, black the inside, and paint the outside.  The cost was $164, and did I ever want this kit telescope!  

It’s for sure sad to see a company that supplied at one time, mirror making kits, mirror cells and other items which other vendors did not sell….out of business after 55+ years.  I like things to stay the same  😦 

Roger Ivester


NGC 772 – Galaxy In Aries – November 2017 Observer’s Challenge Report #105

December 1, 2017

LVAS Observer’s Challenge:  Click on the following link. 


NGC 772, faint mag. 12 galaxy in Aries 

10-inch reflector at 104x, NGC 772 is faint, difficult with low surface brightness, elongated, but subtle, oriented NW-SE.  The middle is a bit brighter with little concentration.  A pin-point stellar nucleus was noted, however intermittently, and required averted version.  Very soft mostly even halo with the edges fading gradually outwards.  My observing location was from my my 5.0 NELM backyard.  

The last time I observed this galaxy was November 1993, from the same location and telescope.  My notes from that session were almost verbatim to my most recent observation.  A true dark site is necessary to see faint details and structure, especially when using a 10-inch telescope.    Roger Ivester

Pencil sketch 10-inch reflector with a 5.0 NELM


Image and notes by James Dire from Hawaii using a 10-inch Newtonian Reflector


Image by Mario Motta:  32-inch Telescope