Archive for January 2019

Debbie Ivester: My First Photo of The Moon Using an iPhone. I’m Now Ready To Go To Another Level and Attempt to Use My DSLR Camera With An Orion 80 mm (Model CT80) f/5 Refractor. Lots to Learn. I’ll Post My Results When Available.

January 22, 2019

I was using an iPhone 10 and a 6-inch f/6 imaging Newtonian reflector telescope, with a 24 mm eyepiece for a magnification of 38x.  After focusing the telescope on the moon, I then handheld the phone up to the telescope eyepiece.  This was a bit more difficult than I would have thought.  

The phone had to be perfectly aligned over the telescope eyepiece, while looking at the phone screen, which required some slight moving around until the moon was visible.  Then a light tap on the phone shutter button, and there was an image of the moon.  Pretty incredible!  A bit of practice was required to get this right. 

Unfortunately some high cirrus clouds began covering the moon.  I chose to use the following photo, despite the clouds as this was my best.  I’ll try again on a better night.  It was also really cold!  

It would have been great if I’d tried this during the lunar eclipse.  

Many thanks to Roger for helping me accomplish this goal on a very cold night…I just wish we’d been able to have done this Sunday night.  We just didn’t know!  

Also, thank you to Richard Nugent of Boston for the post of the Lunar Eclipse that spawned my appetite to be interested in making a photo using an iPhone  and a telescope.  

This is not a big deal to serious astrophotographers, but I’d just always wanted to take a photo of the moon.    

Debbie Ivester 

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Roger helped me set the telescope up and get ready earlier in the evening.  With our Dachshund, Nova Sophia “Sophie” who wants to do everything with us.  Debbie Ivester

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Just received my T-ring and adapter, and have attached my DSLR to an 80 mm f/5 Orion (Model CT80) refractor.  I’m now ready to go to the next step, and will post my results when available.   Debbie 

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NGC 2175: Reflection Nebula in Orion – February 2019 Observer’s Challenge Object #120

January 7, 2019

Observer’s Challenge Report:  FEBRUARY 2019 OBSERVERS CHALLENGE – NGC-2175

If you have identification questions concerning reflection nebula NGC 2175, the following information by Sue French will be of value during your observation.   

NGC 2174 is a brighter knot in the northern part of NGC 2175.  The existence of a true cluster within NGC 2175 is dubious, but the visually involved stars are nonetheless known as Collinder 84.   Sue French

image001

Hi Roger, learning curve to do mosaic well in Pixinsight, but here is my effort.

This is a composite of east and western end of the monkey.
This one only includes Ha and O3 data, S2 could not be incorporated in the composite due to eastern end getting clouds at that time.  So…came out OK, I think.
The following image is about 5 -6 hours total sub time to get. Strl 1001E camera (field of view 17×17 arc minutes per sub) the combo spans about 30 arc minutes. Taken with my 32 inch f/6, 4800mm FL, several nights work
Mario 

ngc2174+2175-monkey

Pencil Sketch by Roger Ivester

ngc 2175

Pencil sketch with colors inverted:

rogers ngc-2175 inverted

Date: January 9, 2019; Conditions: Excellent; NELM 5.2 

Telescope: 10-inch f/4.5 Newtonian reflector; Elapsed time for this object:  Three hours;  Sketch Magnification: 57x; Filter:  O III; Field of View: 1.1º – 66 arcminutes;  Addition magnification, without filter: 95x 

At 57x, using a 20 mm eyepiece, plus O III, the nebula was very easy to locate and see, however, almost invisible without the filter.  The nebula is brightest and more concentrated around the central mag. 7.5 star.  Dark lanes are abundant throughout the nebula, especially looping around the south edge.  With averted vision, NGC 2174, a nebulous patch could be observed on the NW corner, however, not constant.  A small cluster of stars to the ENE of NGC 2175, has the appearance of having nebulosity.  When removing the O III filter, and increasing the magnification to 95x, and with averted vision, many faint stars began to appear within the nebula as shown in my sketch.  Roger Ivester   

 

Image provided by David Blanchette from Las Vegas:  North is up and west to the right.  Telescope and equipment:  8-inch Explore Scientific Newtonian Astrograph, Canon Rebel T7i, 50x60s, ISO 6400, Baader UHC-S filter, Deep-Sky Stacker. 

ngc 2174 north crop

 

Observation notes by Sue French:

I hope to sketch this for the Observer’s Challenge, but in the meantime here are my past logs for NGC 2175:

 

3-1-91, 9:00 PM EST, 10-inch/f6 homemade Newtonian, 32mm Plössl+ O III filter, Seeing: fair, Transparency: good, Aurora

Large, faint, mottled nebula containing a 7.6-magnitude star in a rich field of fainter stars.  About one-half degree in diameter.

 

2-12-96, Winter Star Party, 11:00 PM EST, 105mm AP Traveler prototype, 13mm Nagler, Seeing: fair, Transparency: good

Very nice nebula about 20 arcminutes in diameter. Obvious without filter, but better with the PTR Optics narrowband filter and even better with an O III filter. 7.6-magnitude star near center plus about a dozen faint stars superimposed. Slight mottling to nebula with hints of some dark lanes.

 

3-1-96, 9:35 PM EST, 10-inch/f6 homemade Newtonian, 35mm Panoptic, O III filter, Seeing: fair, Transparency: good

A large, round glow through the O III filter, about 23 arcminutes across.  Despite the outlines in Uranometria, the nebula looks pretty much centered on the 7.6-magnitude star embedded within. The nebula brightens gradually toward the center.  The view is similar with a UHC filter, but not quite as contrasty. Without a filter, the nebula is subtle. It has a dusting of faint stars across it.

 

12-23-16, 12:40 AM EST, My great-nephew’s 8-inch Orion Intelliscope in North Carolina

Visible in 9×50 finder with a 7.6-magnitude star embedded near center.

22mm Nagler: Large, easy to see.  The star near the center is in a star chain that has a prominent hump to the east.  Subtle dark nebulae thread the glow.  Many superimposed stars. The nebula shows nicely when adding a UHC filter.  Somewhat irregular in shape.  The Sh2-252 E nebulous knot doesn’t show particularly well, but it has a superimposed star near its center, too. O III filter makes the nebula seem quite bright to a diameter of 22 arcminutes.

9mm Nagler: The unrelated cluster Pismis 27 (sometimes called NGC 2175.1) shows 6 fairly bright stars in a SSE-NNW bunch, plus a half-dozen faint stars.  Overall the group spans about 4.2 arcminutes.

 

1-30-17, 8:40 PM EST, 10-inch/f5.8 homemade Newtonian, Seeing and Transparency; fair, snowcover, 14°F. breezy

2175 is visible through the 9×50 finder as a distinct sizable glow around a star.

22mm Nagler: The nebula is subtle. Pismis 27 shows 9 stars.  Adding a UHC filter shows a beautiful, large nebula threaded with dark lanes.  The northern border is particularly irregular.  The nebulosity covers about  25 arcminutes.  There’s a very small, brighter patch (Sh2-252 E) 3.2 arcminutes ENE of the star.  The bright patch contains a star and has a pair of matched (m = 10.6, 10.7) stars 2.1 arcminutes north.  There may be a touch of nebulosity in Pismis 27.

22mm Nagler + O III filter: Also makes the nebula stand out well, but I prefer the UHC, which shows off the lines and chains of stars meandering across the nebula.

13mm Nagler: Pismis 27 shows 15 stars in about 4½ × 3 arcminute group running approximately north-south. Includes the close double J1922.

 

My first mention of NGC 2175 in my S&T column, which was then called Small-Scope Sampler, in the February 2004 issue:

Another nice nebula, NGC 2175, sits 1.4º east-northeast of Chi2 (c2) Orionis.  In my little refractor at 47x, I find the nebula obvious without a filter.  However, a narrowband filter betters the view and an OIII filter helps even more.  An 8th-magnitude star is visible near the center, and a dozen faint stars are superimposed.  The nebula is slightly mottled and shows hints of dark lanes.

 

NGC 2175 is sometimes plotted as an open cluster in star atlases while the designation NGC 2174 is given to the nebula.  Neither is correct.  NGC 2175 was discovered sometime in the mid-1800s by the German astronomer Carl Christian Bruhns and first reported by Arthur Auwers who described it as an 8th-magnitude star within a large nebula.

 

NGC 2174 is actually a bright knot of nebulosity in the northern edge of NGC 2175.  It was discovered at Marseille Observatory by Édouard Stephan, widely recognized for the group of galaxies that bears his name – Stephan’s Quintet.  Folks with larger scopes might like to hunt for NGC 2174 and for the even brighter knot Sh 2-252 E, respectively located 11′ north-northwest and 3.3′ east-northeast of the 8th-magnitude star.

 

The existence of an open cluster within the nebula seems debatable.  It was the Swedish astronomer Per Collinder who first noted a cluster here and mistakenly equated it with NGC 2175.  The cluster’s proper designation should then be Collinder 84, but there doesn’t appear to be an obvious concentration of stars within the nebula.  Collinder 84 is supposed to consist of the clumps of stars loosely scattered across most of NGC 2175.  Does it look like a cluster to you?

Sue French