Archive for May 2020

NGC 5689 and Optional Galaxy NGC 5676 In Bootes – June 2020 Observer’s Challenge Report #137

May 20, 2020

MONTHLY OBSERVER’S CHALLENGE

Compiled by:

Roger Ivester, North Carolina

&

Sue French, New York 

June 2020

Report #137

NGC 5689 Galaxy in Ursa Major #138 

“Sharing Observations and Bringing Amateur Astronomers Together”

 

 

Mario Motta:  Observer from Massachusetts

After what was over a month of rain and clouds, finally a clear night last night, see attached, NGC 5689, which is the June object, also noted are NGC5682-83 in lower right side of field.  This group is 110 million light years away.  Mario Motta

Taken with 32-inch telescope, 45 minutes total integration time, with ZWO ASI6200 camera, and processed PixInsight.

Note, I normally take a minimum of over 60 minutes, and I did…but had to drop 4 frames due to incredibly bright satellite trails, unusual for that far north. these trails were much brighter than ordinary satellites , and could not be fully removed with processing, so had to drop frames.

I suspect Starlink satellites, a bad taste of what I suspect is the future, and only a small fraction have yet been put in orbit.

NGC5689

 

Sue French:  Observer from New York  

Date: May 21, 2020

10-inch f/5.9 Newtonian reflector

Seeing: fair.  Transparency: good

I can just barely squash NGC 5689 and NGC 5676 into the field of view at 88×, which has a true field of 56 arcminutes. The sketch shows this along with the brightest field stars. There wasn’t much detail to be seen at this magnification, so I improved the looks of the two galaxies according to their appearance at 187×. At that power, NGC 5689 is an adorable little guy that looks very much like the archetypical UFO. The core’s bulge sticks out more toward the north than the south, and it holds a brighter center. Also at 187×, NGC 5676 hosts an ovalish core, and the galaxy appears brighter NE×E of the core than it does on the opposite side.

NGC 5676 and 5689 cinvc

 

Roger Ivester:  Observer from North Carolina 

NGC 5689 and NGC 5676  

Date:  May 2020

Telescope: 10-inch f/4.5 reflector

Sketch Magnification: 200x

NELM:  4.8

Faint and dim from my moderately light polluted backyard.  Poor transparency, due to springtime pollen and ambient lighting mixing together creating sky glow, similar to  snow covering.  

NGC 5689:  Elongated EW, brighter central region, with mottling in both the core and arms.  When using averted vision at 200x, a stellar nucleus can be seen, but not constantly.  Looking approximately 50 arcminutes to the NNW is galaxy NGC 5676.  

NGC 5676:  Brighter than NGC 5689, but very close and also similar in size.  This galaxy is elongated, oriented NE-SW, with a subtle brightening in the central region, with even concentration.  

Pencil sketch with inverted colors:  NGC 5689

NGC 5689 Roger

Pencil sketch with inverted colors:  NGC 5676 

NGC 5676 Roger    

“Celestial Harvest” The Book: By Guest Host, James Mullaney

May 18, 2020

CELESTIAL HARVEST:  HOW IT HAPPENED

When I first become a budding stargazer at age 14 and anxious to see everything in the sky, I consulted a number of supposed “showpiece” lists – and soon became disappointed and frustrated.  Many were obviously compiled based on photographs and not visual impressions, including objects like the Horsehead Nebula.  So I decided to survey the entire sky visible from my home (back then) in Pittsburgh.  I wrote to my idol Walter Scott Houston (Scotty) and told him of my plan.  He kindly replied saying he was afraid this was an impossible project in aesthetics – but then, characteristically, said “Go for it!”

As a result, nearly 50 years later and over 20,000 hours spent at the eyepieces of many dozens of telescopes of every size, type, and make from 2-inches to 13-inches (Allegheny Observatory’s famed 13-inch Fitz-Clark refractor) in aperture, in 1998 I self-published Celestial Harvest: 300-Plus Showpieces of the Heavens for Telescope Viewing & Contemplation (later reprinted by Dover Publications in 2002).   Thus, my lifelong labor-of-love came to be born!

James Mullaney