Archive for December 2015

NGC 1579 – “The Northern Trifid” – Reflection Nebula in Perseus – February 19th 2013

December 19, 2015

rogerivester

NGC 1579 – “The Northern Trifid”  Reflection Nebula in Perseus 

Date: January 31st 2013 – Telescope: 10-inch f/4.5 reflector @ 104x – Location: Moderately light polluted Backyard in western North Carolina with a NELM 4.8 

Faint and very diffuse with a brighter oval shaped middle.  The texture is somewhat mottled and uneven, and at least two dark lanes can be seen with averted vision (see sketch).  The nebula has very uneven edges which fade very gradually outwards.  A 12M star lies just to the NE, and a group of four stars to the south make the shape of a dipper.  This is a most interesting object which seems to be overlooked by many amateurs.  The following sketch was made using a 5 x 8 blank notecard, a No. 2 pencil, and an eraser.  The color was inverted using a scanner…

Roger Ivester  2-16-13

NGC 1579 - Reflection Nebulae-1

Date: January 31st 2013 – 10-inch reflector @…

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Roger Ivester: Amateur Astronomer

December 15, 2015

     Thank you for visiting my site. I’m hopeful that you’ll find it both interesting and possibly beneficial in your future observations.  

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      I became interested in astronomy in the mid-60’s at the age of twelve. One of my older brothers had purchased a 60mm EQ refractor.      

     I grew up in the foothills of North Carolina, in a very rural area.  It was a fabulous place for a budding new amateur astronomer, completely devoid of light pollution. The sky was velvety black with the Milky Way extending almost to the southern horizon.     

     It wasn’t until the mid-70’s that I acquired my very own telescope, a 4 1/4-inch Edmund Newtonian EQ reflector.  This was not my first choice, as I really wanted the 6-inch Super Space Conquerer, but it was the best my budget would allow.   

     By this time the fabulous skies of my early years were gone. I’d moved to an area packed with houses and street lights, but I made the best of the situation and continued to observe.     

     In 1985 a local astronomy club was formed and I became a member with my youngest son, Brad.  This got me back into astronomy after a five year hiatus.  It was Brad that wanted to join the astronomy club.  I’m glad he did.      

      In 1992 I became a much more serious observer, with a new 10-inch EQ Meade reflector.  And fortunately by this time, I was also living in a much darker area.  I began making pencil sketches, which really helped me to become a far better visual observer.  

     I am the co-founder of the Observer’s Challenge report, along with Fred Rayworth of Las Vegas.  The Observer’s Challenge is an international deep-sky observing report, which allows any serious amateur the opportunity to share notes, sketches and images for a preselected deep-sky object on a monthly basis.  The challenge report will celebrate its 13th year in 2021.   All of the reports to-date are included in the following link. 

https://rogerivester.com/category/observers-challenge-reports-complete/

      In October 2018, Sue French, “Contributing Editor” for “Sky & Telescope Magazine” became the Observer’s Challenge special advisor, after many years as a participant.  Sue wrote the very popular monthly “Deep-Sky Wonders” column for twenty years.  As of November 2019, Sue has agreed to help compile and edit the challenge report.  

     I was fortunate to be able to play a role in the Mount Potosi Observing Complex in Southern Nevada, facilitating a $50,000 telescope donation by Dr. James Hermann, M.D. from North Carolina. The facility has been featured in Astronomy Magazine, the Las Vegas Review Journal and other publications.

https://rogerivester.com/category/mount-potosi-observing-complex-in-southern-nevada/  

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NGC 7789, Open Cluster in Cassiopeia

December 14, 2015

NOVEMBER 2015 OBSERVERS CHALLENGE – NGC-7789 

NGC 7789, Open Cluster in Cassiopeia:  Location of observation:  From my moderately light polluted backyard in Western North Carolina 

Observer:  Roger Ivester 
Date: October 7th 2015
Conditions: Good   NELM: 5.2
Telescope: 10-inch f/4.5 Newtonian Reflector
Sketch Magnification: 104x    FOV: 0.79º
Catalogued Magnitude: 6.7

Very bright and rich with well over 120 stars counted with the 10-inch. The cluster stars encompass an area of about 25 arcminutes. Loops of stars with dark lanes throughout, but mostly a random scattering of stars. A fairly bright, mag. 9 star is located just off the cluster edge toward the west.  

Pencil Sketch with inverted colors.

Rogers NGC-7789

Image by Dr. James Dire of Hawaii using a 10-inch f/4 reflector, and a SBIG ST-2000 XCM CCD camera.  Exposure time 30 minutes.

NGC7789

The following notes and pencil sketch (with inverted colors) of NGC 7789:  By Jaakko Saloranta of Finland

Despite poor observing conditions a rich and very beautiful cluster.

Strong background glow is lost at high magnification.  Several dark pathways visible within the cluster as starless regions.  

Brighter stars concentrated towards the W edge. ~80* within 9′ down to 13th magnitude.  Resembles an open rose.  

Sketch @ 101x (30′) using a 4.5 inch Orion SkyQuest.

NGC7789_LVAS